World Chess Championship 2013 Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen at Chennai Hyatt Regency

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Sunday, December 1, 2013

'Because there is No Shame in Admitting that I'm a Fan of Magnus Carlsen...'

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Sunday, December 1, 2013
World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in Chennai at the closing ceremony of the World Title Match versus Viswanathan Anand. Photo: official website



Times of India sports editor in Pune, Amit Karmakar declares all the reasons why Magnus Carlsen is so special! (This post first appeared: Times of India blogs dated Nov 28, 2013). 


WHY MAGNUS CARLSEN IS SO SPECIAL

  • Because there is no shame in admitting that I'm a fan of Magnus Carlsen. Outrageous young talent has this tendency to 'normalise'!

  • Because the way he plays the game: Uncompromising! When asked why he didn't offer a draw to Anand in the 10th game of the World championship match which could have sealed his title, he told his father and manager: "I'm a chess player. I'm supposed to PLAY chess!"

  • Because there can't be a more powerful slap than the above quote for those who play agreed, spineless, fightless, disgraceful draws at the top level. Agreed draws is the biggest threat to the game of chess after lack of corporate sponsorship.

  • Because the distribution of seven draws in the Anand-Carlsen match was thus: two with three-fold repetition, two dead draws; two insufficient material, one agreed draw. It came as an oasis after last year's Anand-Gelfand match.

  • Because he has openly said that opening preparation is a bit over-rated.

  • Because in his hands black or white pieces aim to attain the same terrain: equality (opening), quality (middlegame), superiority (endgame).

  • Because he has proved that majority of players agree for half-baked draws because they are mutually not confident about their endgame skills!

  • Because he is a pathbreaker. He can bypass opening preparation of the best opposition. And that may suggest that his understanding of openings is better than those who 'scholarise' it.

  • Because he calculates better than the computer in endgame.

  • Because he gives hope to all those by proving that one can excel in chess with smart work, not necessarily hard work which kills creativity, confidence and ability to fight till the end.

  • Because being an outgoing, sporty and fun person, he is the best brand ambassador for the game if you want to attract youth to the sport. 

  • Because he plays on equal, or slightly minus positions, as if nothing has happened. When others psychologically suffer due to lack of initiative on the board, he maintains his composure and plays with confidence.

  • Because he is the "most undisputed" world champion since Garry Kasparov. Of course, Kramnik and Anand proved their credentials beyond doubt. But they got a shot at the matchplay titles in dubious circumstances. Kramnik didn't prove before his 2000 match against Kasparov that he was a worthy challenger. And when Anand became the challenger through Mexico win in 2007, Topalov was not eligible to play that tournament.

  • Because he is undisputed world No. 1 and won a right to challenge Anand though a proper candidates tournament. It's a poetic justice that one win there counted for more than Kramnik's two draws. 

  • Because he defeated Anand 3-0. Not via tie-breaks or not with +1 score. He showed his strength and deep understanding of the game on the highest stage.

  • Because Anand responded to a somewhat irritating question after losing his title (would he have chosen a better challenger to his throne than Carlsen?): "I didn't choose him." Well, Anand is spot on. Magnus was chosen by the bigger force.


Saturday, November 30, 2013

Recent Chess Trend is away from Openings as Computers have killed Opening Phase: Vishy Anand

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Saturday, November 30, 2013
Here is another cool interview with former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand after yesterday's IBNLive video interview with Rajdeep Sardesai. Excerpts from FirstPost interview with Grandmaster Vishy Anand of India:

Q: Magnus Carlsen has, at various points, mentioned that once he sits down on the chess board he doesn’t believe that anyone could beat him. He carried that same confidence into the World Championship match too. What were your thoughts at the start of the match? Did you feel invincible too? 

Viswanathan Anand: I thought that if I had a good start, I would be able to play well. I thought that if I had a good start, I could force him out of his comfort zones. I was under no illusions that I would have to raise my game – but that’s exactly what I had worked so hard for. I knew I had a chance. I knew my recent shape had not been very good. But I was hoping that I had managed to turn all that around. 
 
Viswanathan Anand at World Chess Championship 2013 closing ceremony. Photo: Official website 

Q: A match like this is always tough. In the sense, it almost feels like you are locked in a cage at times. At what point did you think it was over for you?

Viswanathan Anand: Well, it was staggered. The first few games were probably okay. I thought I held my own. The fifth game (his endgame errors cost game five) loss hit me really hard. It was precisely the thing that I had worked so hard on; the areas that I had sought to improve in my preparation and I was unable to execute. In that sense, I failed. The 9th game blunder didn’t change things very much – I didn’t see a win, it would have been a draw. The 10th game was really nothing.

Q: So what is it about Carlsen? Did any aspect of his game surprise you?

Viswanathan Anand: He surprised me by changing so little. I know how he plays. But I expected him to come out and try something different. But he stuck to his guns – it was brave. It was also unexpected for me. Usually for a World Championship match, people work on something different… maybe something to surprise the opponent. Carlsen just stayed the same.

Q: You have said that you couldn’t figure out Carlsen’s style. What does that mean?

Viswanathan Anand: I thought I could get a grip on him. I thought that I could force him to make mistakes. I thought that if I stayed with him in the early going, I would be able to match him. But his style makes it difficult. In a sense, he is an all-rounder. He can do everything well and he makes mistakes – but they aren’t big enough to take advantage of. He is also unconventional – there are times when he will play something and take it back on the next move… to the same place.

Q: Did it feel like you were playing a computer?

Viswanathan Anand: His approach resembles… I hesitate to say… computer. Put him in front of one and he’d lose easily. But he is very confident of his calculating ability – so in that sense… yes, probably like a human computer – if that makes sense.

Q: One of the things that were mentioned before the start of the match was that Anand was the openings specialist and Carlsen took over in the middle and end game. Do you think you did enough with that advantage?

Viswanathan Anand: I think what is not understood about Carlsen is that he is not bad at openings. He is not a specialist but a generalist. He can play a lot of opening and he can play them at a fairly high level. His aim is to get a solid position and you can’t do that at the top level if you are bad with openings. This thing about openings is an exaggeration.

Q: So if Carlsen were to play Kasaprov – you have played them both – who wins?

Viswanathan Anand: One thing that is clear about Carlsen is that he is one of a kind. I am a big believer in comparisons. I would say both are very good, very strong. But these are the kind of kind of comparisons that chess buffs all over the world make all the time. It probably just adds to the fun… Well, Carlsen is a more all-round player. His strengths are harder to determine. Kasaparov was a specialist. He thought hard about his game and had very specific strengths. So if anything, I would Carlsen the edge there. Being an all-rounder is not easy – you are backing yourself to keep up the level throughout the game but somehow Carlsen has managed it.

Q: In interviews to the Norwegian press, Carlsen has criticised your approach, saying that you blamed tournament losses to preparation for the world championships. He has also said that he will never do that. Your thoughts?

Viswanathan Anand: I guess you have to put up with some snide remarks when you have lost. But honestly, what can I say…

Q: You have spoken about wanting to play in the Candidates next year. Does this loss change anything? Will your method change? Will you change?

Viswanathan Anand: I think the recent trend is away from openings. In a sense, computers have killed the opening phase. There is only so much that you can do. So if anything can be done, it is to rebalance the game. That can only happen by concentrating on the middle and end game. For now though, I have taken a break from chess. Then I got to London for a tournament. Then I take another break – a long break. That’s when I will give it some serious thought – what I want to do and how I want to do it.

Q: Do you think about your legacy? Is it about time to start thinking about it?

Viswanathan Anand: Well, there are times when you wonder what you have done for the sport. I am happy at the kind of response that the match got in India and I feel I played some part in it. I would like to believe that India understands chess and with NIIT Mind Champions academy, I hope to help more players in the country. A legacy though is not just about what I think. Finally, how are you going to wind down? Probably with a game of Blitz – maybe on the internet, maybe just at home. Blitz would be fun. For the moment, I just want to enjoy chess without thinking of results; without thinking really.

Friday, November 29, 2013

No Retirement, Asserts Viswanathan Anand (Must Watch Exclusive Video Interview with CNN-IBN Live)

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Friday, November 29, 2013
Former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand has said that retirement is not on the cards for him after the recent world title loss to Magnus Carlsen of Norway. The Indian Grandmaster said he needed some time off from chess to spend with his family. Anand will play the upcoming London Chess Classic from December 7, 2013 before taking a sabbatical. 



World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen`s Blog at Arctic Securities
Chennai World Championship Match 2013 Victory!

Magnus and (most of the) his team returned to Norway yesterday to a great reception. It is time to finally provide an account of the last games. The change of direction of the match after the last rest day was appreciated by the spectators. In game 9 Anand came out blazing with 1.d4 and the 5.f3 Nimzo-Indian. 


The early g4 lead to a race, Magnus advancing on the queen side and Anand’s pawn storm on the king side. It looked dangerous for black and Magnus needed to find all the right moves to survive. After white played Rf4 threatening Rh4 and mate on h7, the position was still unclear despite the extra black queen. 

With less than 10 minutes left on 12 moves Anand suddenly miscalculated and after Nf1, (instead of Bf1) Qe1 clinched a full point for Magnus. Not many had significant expectations for the last game as a draw with white would finish the match for Magnus, and Anand seemed beyond realistic hope trailing 3-6. 

Some inaccuracies by both players, including what was probably a missed win or two by Magnus does not diminish the fact that they fought until just kings were left on the table! 

Consequently Magnus won the World Championship title with 6.5 points against 3.5 in the best-of-twelve match! On the prize giving ceremony, Magnus was awarded an impressive trophy, a gold medal, a symbolic check and a garland, and Anand received a huge silver plate and his check. 

In the VIP lounge right after the ceremony, eager photographers taking pictures of Magnus with the gold medal fought for the best places creating a commotion we have never experienced before except maybe earlier in this match! With some help from the organisers and local police Magnus and the team could move on to interviews and press sessions in the media centre upstairs. 

______________________________________________
A sponsoring agreement has been agreed between Arctic Securities and Magnus Carlsen. Magnus became an International Grandmaster at the age of 13, the youngest at the time. In October 2009, during the Nanjing Pearl Spring tournament, he became the fifth chess player in the history to achieve an Elo-rating over 2800 – by far the youngest to do so. That year he also became The World Blitz Chess Champion. On January the 1st of 2010 the new FIDE list was published and at the age of 19 Magnus became the youngest ever chess player to be ranked World Number One. Carlsen is the best representative for top excellence within both analysis and implementation.

_______________________________

Magnus felt the turning point of the match was game 3 and 4. Despite Magnus’s difficult position in game 3, the way that Anand seemed slightly uncomfortable and did not go for the critical lines contributed to a renewed confidence on Magnus’s part. 

From game 4 onwards he settled into his usual stride and just enjoyed the match. It might be a disadvantage to play on your opponent’s home ground in chess as in other sports, but this effect was ameliorated by the way the organisers, headed by Mr. Sundar, and the hotel with all its great staff and our butler Syed, really did everything they could to make Magnus and the team comfortable.

The playing conditions, the hotel rooms, the food, and service, the opportunity to play football and basketball on some of the rest days and the hospitality and kindness shown by Indians we met, all contributed to our well-being. Thank you, we are eternally grateful! 

Once Anand lost in round 5, playing at home with all the expectations and broad support he received throughout the match might even have been a significant disadvantage in the end. After the match Magnus observed that playing on one of the players home ground adds another dimension to the match. 

At the airport we were greeted with water canons and met by the Baerum mayor, journalists and enthusiasts. Magnus is really grateful to his seconds, headed by Jon Ludvig Hammer, his team, and everyone who has supported him one way or another to help him reach and win the World Championship match against V.Anand. Thank you!! 

--For Team Carlsen, Henrik C., Haslum, November 28th, 2013 

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Chess has become Cool: Nigel Short Summary of Anand, Carlsen Chennai World Chess Championship

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Thursday, November 28, 2013


British Grandmaster (and lots more) Nigel Short's summary of the Anand - Carlsen Chennai World Chess Championship 2013, courtesy Indian Express.  
A champion of his time


Nigel Short

At Chennai, as Carlsen outplayed Anand, the dignified but staid image of the game changed.

As the dust settles on the Viswanathan Anand versus Magnus Carlsen match in Chennai — the biggest chess clash since Bobby Fischer vs Boris Spassky in 1972 — it is time to reflect upon its impact. The immense interest, both in India and abroad, of this most cerebral of jousts, belies the pessimist's view that chess requires Cold War rivalry to be marketable. Indians proudly cheered, and sometimes even prayed, in huge numbers, for their mighty warrior. Alas, it was always going be an unforgiving task for Anand — at almost 44, the oldest World Champion in half a century — to cling on to his crown against someone half his age and already the highest-rated player in history. Time and tide tarries for no man.

Carlsen's victory gives succour to the countless enthusiasts who feared that modern chess was becoming an ever-accelerating arms-race of computer engine analysis. It is hard to recall any World Championship match that has been so bereft of theoretical novelties, as the young Norwegian constantly sought to sidestep Anand's renowned preparation by going down less travelled paths. His simple philosophy was, in essence, "Give me an equal position that you have not studied with a computer and I will outplay you." Call it cocky, if you will, but he was right. Twice, in games five and six, he defeated Anand with the slenderest of endgame advantages, defying the expectations of even the finest experts. It simply does not do credit to Carlsen to say that Anand just blundered. He blundered — yes — but only because he was subjected to constant, nagging pressure. To use a cricketing analogy, Carlsen's style most resembles that of Glenn McGrath — unspectacular, but extraordinarily accurate and effective. Only once did Anand seek to drastically alter the course of the match — in game nine, when he was already on the verge of defeat. From the first move he sought to gain the upper hand by striving for complications. It was the correct strategy and was nearly successful, as he built up an imposing attack. Anand must have felt he had an excellent position. But first, he dithered slightly with an unnecessary rook exchange, and then spent 40 minutes looking for a forced win where none existed. Faced with a resolute, calm defence and the knowledge that the title was ebbing from him, Anand cracked first with a hideous and uncharacteristic howler.

It would be tempting to now predict a lengthy reign for Carlsen. He is well-balanced, from a good family and not in the least bit weird. He is still ridiculously young, but has already dominated the chess world for the past few years. Yet, while I consider the above prognosis to be the most plausible, the example of Vladimir Kramnik, who defeated the legendary Garry Kasparov in 2000, provides a cautionary note. The lack of motivation, bordering on apathy, combined with an unpleasant illness (arthritis), meant that the Russian's play nose-dived in the years following his scaling of the highest summit. With his health recovered, he has, arguably, only relatively recently regained the drive and form he once possessed. Indeed, after playing superbly at the London Candidates back in March, he was edged out of another World Championship match by Carlsen with the slenderest of margins — on tiebreak. Of Carlsen's most likely challengers in 2014, I would say that Kramnik, despite his ripe age (38), will give him the hardest time. Another tough opponent will be the world number two, Levon Aronian (31) from Armenia — although I would still back Carlsen to fend off either threat. Beyond that short horizon, one must look to the next generation — such as Hikaru Nakamura from America (who, on Twitter, perhaps not entirely jokingly, refers to Carlsen as "Sauron" — the evil, all-seeing eye from Lord of the Rings), Fabiano Caruana from Italy, or maybe Sergey Karjakin from Russia.

Undoubtedly the most exciting thing about the Chennai match is the palpable feeling that the dignified but slightly staid image of the game has abruptly changed. With a young, G-Star Raw model as World Champion, chess has become cool. It is suddenly reaching new audiences that had been hitherto untouched by its esoteric beauty. This was most graphically demonstrated by the Norwegian schoolgirls who famously undressed for Carlsen in a moment of patriotic fervour. More seriously, countless international media outlets, that have previously neglected chess, have this time covered the drama in Tamil Nadu.

India may be mourning the loss of a great champion but, when the tears have dried, people will remember that Anand has inspired an entire generation of chess players. The country has gone from being mediocre to being a powerhouse in a few decades, for which he can take much of the credit. As yet, no one is quite ready to step into his shoes but, given the extraordinary and increasing strength and depth of Indian chess, it is surely only a short matter of time. 

Magnus Carlsen dominated from the Start: BBC Video

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog
Here is the cool BBC video on Magnus Carlsen winning the World Chess Championship title by beating Viswanathan Anand in Chennai recently.




Congratulations, Magnus!

Last updated: 22.11.2013 // The Embassy of Norway warmly congratulates the new Chess World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, on winning the World Chess Championship, held in Chennai.

The young champion has also truly managed to put Norway on the map in India, perhaps as never before. He has excelled as an Ambassador for his country both in India and around the world as a fantastic player and sportsman that we are very proud of.

We would also like to pay our respect to Viswanathan Anand, for his play and great sportsmanship, for his contributions to chess internationally and in his own country over many years.

The Embassy would like to extend a big thank you to the organizers and to the government of Tamil Nadu, led by Chief Minister Ms J. Jayalalithaa, for their kind hospitality and for making the championship a most successful event.

We look forward to welcoming everyone to the Chess Olympiad 2014 in Tromsø, the Arctic City of Northern Norway. Thus the games will continue, now with even stronger ties of friendship between Norway and India.

Eivind S. Homme
Ambassador


* The Norwegian Embassy in New Delhi credits the photo to Magnus Carlsen's official website.
* His Excellency Eivind S. Homme's biography is here.

World No. 1, and now World Chess Champion, Magnus Carlsen received a huge welcome by journalists and fans at the Oslo airport in Norway on Wednesday evening (India time 6.30 pm). The Qatar Airways flight carrying the young talent and his team was greeted with water cannons - a salute employed last time in 2009, in Norway, when singer and violinist Alexander Rybak reached after winning the Eurovision Song Contest.

"It's great to be home. I really appreciate that there is such a huge crowd here," he said in a brief press conference. "I'm already looking forward to defending the title, no matter who the opponent is." 

For the immediate future, he added, "I'm just going to sleep and relax." 

Here is a video by Ruptly, an international video news agency headquartered in Berlin, Germany. Launched in 2012. (More videos, updates later)


International comedian Michael Kosta of Fox Sports Discusses Why you Should Date Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen! Was this just the article you were waiting for? Stop being a pawn in love, date the King, suggests Michael Kosta! Too funny!


Comedian Michael Kosta (official website) lends his trademark banter to the conversation each day on Crowd Goes Wild. Known primarily for his humor and sarcastic wit, Kosta also brings a sports background to the FOX Sports family. He played tennis professionally and at the University of Illinois, where he won four Big Ten championships, and was an assistant tennis coach at the University of Michigan.

Viswanathan Anand: A Victim of his own Hubris?

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog
Sumit Chakraberty is the author of 'Master Laster: What They Don't Tell You About Sachin Tendulkar' (This article first appeared in The Economic Times)

On hindsight, it seems apparent that Viswanathan Anand should have taken more of an initiative at the very outset of his world championship match with Magnus Carlsen in Chennai. He quickly forced a draw with black pieces in the first game, and then opted for a queen exchange and another quick draw when Carlsen surprised him with the Caro Kann defence in the second game. Even in the third game, which seemed to be developing into the sort of complexity in the middle that Anand relishes, he chose a risk-free line when a pawn sacrifice was offered.

Carlsen appeared uncharacteristically vulnerable in that first quarter of the championship. But Anand could not pounce on that unexpected vulnerability, because his own strategy was to put safety first, and avoid risks. In fact, from game four onwards, he seemed quite willing to be drawn into long end games, which is known to be Carlsen's strength.

A five-time world champion does not play like that, especially at the start of a championship, unless that is what he had planned. Even at the end, after everything had gone horribly wrong, Anand never admitted that his risk-free strategy was wrong; he only said he had failed in its execution. So what could Anand have been thinking?

Carlsen is not too hot on opening theory, nor does he set much store by complicated middle games with too many pieces. His preferred route to a kill is an endgame that stretches for hours until his victim succumbs to relentless pressure or makes a mistake out of sheer mental exhaustion.

But what if somebody as good as Anand could withstand that pressure and not make mistakes in endgame after endgame? Would it then be Carlsen who would eventually get frustrated and crack, or be forced to try a different tack where he is less sure of himself ? For somebody who has been world champion for so many years, it is natural to back oneself to concentrate and play error-free chess, especially in the simplified positions of an endgame, however long it stretched. Why should the world champion be the one to open himself to counterattack by risky play in the middle game, while the challenger sat back and played solid, safe chess?

Ultimately, Anand was a victim of this self-belief. He did not take his age or fitness into account. He also discounted his erratic play in the last year or so, and Carlsen's immaculate record for over two years during which he was rated the No.1 player in the world. If he had factored all that in, he would have happily risked going into uncharted territory in the middle game when Carlsen deliberately made sub-optimal moves to disturb Anand's prepared lines of play. In fact, he came close to beating Carlsen only in Game 9 when he went on a risky all-out attack in desperation.

Anand may still have lost if he had taken more risks from the beginning, but at least his strategy would have reflected selfawareness, rather than being in denial about the reality of his own age and his rival's No.1 status. The deposed champion has won hearts over the years with his humility, but may have succumbed to his own hubris in the end.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Magnus Carlsen: I can Relax a bit as World No. 1 is also World Chess Champion Now and do What I do Best!

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Magnus Carlsen Interview: One of the first, and delightful, interviews conducted with the World No. 1 was by Susan Ninan for Times of India.

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway in Chennai. (Official website)

CHENNAI: The crown sits pretty, so does the newly-coronated king's charm. Magnus Carlsen is a picture of earnest patience as he braved questions by the dozen and posed almost endlessly for shutterbugs, all with the lopsided smile in place. Two days after his title conquest, the 22 year-old Norwegian spoke on a range of topics, from why he chose not to reveal his seconds, what he has learnt from Anand to why the five-time Indian champion does not figure among his favourites to turn challenger. Excerpts...
On whether the match ended earlier than he expected...

I thought it was hard at the start. In the first game, Vishy introduced novelty in a really obscure line and when I was discussing the game with him afterwards I was very impressed with everything he'd seen and how fast he had been thinking. I thought to myself that if he's prepared even in this line, how am I ever going to catch him off guard? But fortunately it turned out that he was also a bit nervous after a few games and I settled in and dominated the match.

On why Anand does not figure (Carlsen had recently named Aronian and Kramnik) among those he feels could be his next challenger...

Firstly, Vishy will have to figure out if he would want to play in the Candidates tournament. Although he's an all-time great player, his results lately have not been too good and he'll need some time to readjust to be able to come back. It all depends on him now. He needs to figure some things out and if he manages to keep his motivation after this match he will still be a force to reckon with. Right now though I don't think he's the biggest favourite at the Candidates.

On what he's learnt from Anand...

To be honest I've learnt a lot from him in the past, both playing against him and especially while training with him. Just the kind of positions that he understands, the way he would just outplay me like no one else did in several kinds of positions. Also the precision with which he analyses games and positions has been an eye-opener. In this match I showed him in a way that although he's taught me many things in the past, it's probably now my turn to teach him. So, it's safe to say I've surpassed him now.

On whether all his strategies worked against Anand and how much of a role age and psychology played...

The main objective in my preparation was to get a playable position and not to come under any great pressure from the opening. I managed to equalise the game from the opening especially with black pieces and was able to push and outplay him in the rest of the games. Age was partly a factor. I could also sense that he was nervous and vulnerable. But regardless of everything else, he just lost to a better player.

On whether next year's title match is already on his mind...

Yes, I'm already thinking about it. It is also a reason why I have not spoken much about my current seconds since they could be part of my team then as well. I have the lead in world rankings and the title as well now. I don't think it's my duty to think who will play against me, it should in fact be the other way round. My opponents will have to figure out how to deal with me. I think I will be the man to beat for quite some time now.

On whether he believes the 12-game format is the right way to go about the title contest...

Anything between 12-16 games is fine. More than that would not be ideal in the modern era.

On what the title means to him and the responsibilities of being a world chess champion...

I've been ranked number 1 in the world for sometime now, but it always has been a bit of a burden not having the world title. It means a great deal to have won it finally and is a dream come true. So I can relax a bit now and do what I do best. As far as responsibilities are concerned, I just need to do what I've been doing so far.

On whom he owes his win to...
My family especially my father, team and seconds. They have attended to all my requests, no matter how unreasonable those might have been. My seconds have worked hard and have not slept well so that I would be well prepared. They actually worked harder than I asked them to!


World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen has landed in Oslo. Watch Live Right now on NRK TV (can you spot him - swamped by fans and media?) He is signing autographs and taking media questions at the same time!

The World Chess Champion takes on question after question with fantastic aplomb.



Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Chess TV Exclusive: World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Tuesday, November 26, 2013
World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich in an exclusive interview for Chess TV: (http://chesstv.ru/) - первый в мире шахматный телеканал с круглосуточным вещанием и большим количеством прямых трансляций с крупнейших турниров (premier channel of the world of chess relaying chess programmes and principal tournaments).