World Chess Championship 2013 Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen at Chennai Hyatt Regency

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Thursday, November 28, 2013

Michael Kosta (Fox Sports) on Why you Should Date Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen!

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Thursday, November 28, 2013

International comedian Michael Kosta of Fox Sports Discusses Why you Should Date Chess World Champion Magnus Carlsen! Was this just the article you were waiting for? Stop being a pawn in love, date the King, suggests Michael Kosta! Too funny!


Comedian Michael Kosta (official website) lends his trademark banter to the conversation each day on Crowd Goes Wild. Known primarily for his humor and sarcastic wit, Kosta also brings a sports background to the FOX Sports family. He played tennis professionally and at the University of Illinois, where he won four Big Ten championships, and was an assistant tennis coach at the University of Michigan.

Viswanathan Anand: A Victim of his own Hubris?

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog
Sumit Chakraberty is the author of 'Master Laster: What They Don't Tell You About Sachin Tendulkar' (This article first appeared in The Economic Times)

On hindsight, it seems apparent that Viswanathan Anand should have taken more of an initiative at the very outset of his world championship match with Magnus Carlsen in Chennai. He quickly forced a draw with black pieces in the first game, and then opted for a queen exchange and another quick draw when Carlsen surprised him with the Caro Kann defence in the second game. Even in the third game, which seemed to be developing into the sort of complexity in the middle that Anand relishes, he chose a risk-free line when a pawn sacrifice was offered.

Carlsen appeared uncharacteristically vulnerable in that first quarter of the championship. But Anand could not pounce on that unexpected vulnerability, because his own strategy was to put safety first, and avoid risks. In fact, from game four onwards, he seemed quite willing to be drawn into long end games, which is known to be Carlsen's strength.

A five-time world champion does not play like that, especially at the start of a championship, unless that is what he had planned. Even at the end, after everything had gone horribly wrong, Anand never admitted that his risk-free strategy was wrong; he only said he had failed in its execution. So what could Anand have been thinking?

Carlsen is not too hot on opening theory, nor does he set much store by complicated middle games with too many pieces. His preferred route to a kill is an endgame that stretches for hours until his victim succumbs to relentless pressure or makes a mistake out of sheer mental exhaustion.

But what if somebody as good as Anand could withstand that pressure and not make mistakes in endgame after endgame? Would it then be Carlsen who would eventually get frustrated and crack, or be forced to try a different tack where he is less sure of himself ? For somebody who has been world champion for so many years, it is natural to back oneself to concentrate and play error-free chess, especially in the simplified positions of an endgame, however long it stretched. Why should the world champion be the one to open himself to counterattack by risky play in the middle game, while the challenger sat back and played solid, safe chess?

Ultimately, Anand was a victim of this self-belief. He did not take his age or fitness into account. He also discounted his erratic play in the last year or so, and Carlsen's immaculate record for over two years during which he was rated the No.1 player in the world. If he had factored all that in, he would have happily risked going into uncharted territory in the middle game when Carlsen deliberately made sub-optimal moves to disturb Anand's prepared lines of play. In fact, he came close to beating Carlsen only in Game 9 when he went on a risky all-out attack in desperation.

Anand may still have lost if he had taken more risks from the beginning, but at least his strategy would have reflected selfawareness, rather than being in denial about the reality of his own age and his rival's No.1 status. The deposed champion has won hearts over the years with his humility, but may have succumbed to his own hubris in the end.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Magnus Carlsen: I can Relax a bit as World No. 1 is also World Chess Champion Now and do What I do Best!

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Magnus Carlsen Interview: One of the first, and delightful, interviews conducted with the World No. 1 was by Susan Ninan for Times of India.

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway in Chennai. (Official website)

CHENNAI: The crown sits pretty, so does the newly-coronated king's charm. Magnus Carlsen is a picture of earnest patience as he braved questions by the dozen and posed almost endlessly for shutterbugs, all with the lopsided smile in place. Two days after his title conquest, the 22 year-old Norwegian spoke on a range of topics, from why he chose not to reveal his seconds, what he has learnt from Anand to why the five-time Indian champion does not figure among his favourites to turn challenger. Excerpts...
On whether the match ended earlier than he expected...

I thought it was hard at the start. In the first game, Vishy introduced novelty in a really obscure line and when I was discussing the game with him afterwards I was very impressed with everything he'd seen and how fast he had been thinking. I thought to myself that if he's prepared even in this line, how am I ever going to catch him off guard? But fortunately it turned out that he was also a bit nervous after a few games and I settled in and dominated the match.

On why Anand does not figure (Carlsen had recently named Aronian and Kramnik) among those he feels could be his next challenger...

Firstly, Vishy will have to figure out if he would want to play in the Candidates tournament. Although he's an all-time great player, his results lately have not been too good and he'll need some time to readjust to be able to come back. It all depends on him now. He needs to figure some things out and if he manages to keep his motivation after this match he will still be a force to reckon with. Right now though I don't think he's the biggest favourite at the Candidates.

On what he's learnt from Anand...

To be honest I've learnt a lot from him in the past, both playing against him and especially while training with him. Just the kind of positions that he understands, the way he would just outplay me like no one else did in several kinds of positions. Also the precision with which he analyses games and positions has been an eye-opener. In this match I showed him in a way that although he's taught me many things in the past, it's probably now my turn to teach him. So, it's safe to say I've surpassed him now.

On whether all his strategies worked against Anand and how much of a role age and psychology played...

The main objective in my preparation was to get a playable position and not to come under any great pressure from the opening. I managed to equalise the game from the opening especially with black pieces and was able to push and outplay him in the rest of the games. Age was partly a factor. I could also sense that he was nervous and vulnerable. But regardless of everything else, he just lost to a better player.

On whether next year's title match is already on his mind...

Yes, I'm already thinking about it. It is also a reason why I have not spoken much about my current seconds since they could be part of my team then as well. I have the lead in world rankings and the title as well now. I don't think it's my duty to think who will play against me, it should in fact be the other way round. My opponents will have to figure out how to deal with me. I think I will be the man to beat for quite some time now.

On whether he believes the 12-game format is the right way to go about the title contest...

Anything between 12-16 games is fine. More than that would not be ideal in the modern era.

On what the title means to him and the responsibilities of being a world chess champion...

I've been ranked number 1 in the world for sometime now, but it always has been a bit of a burden not having the world title. It means a great deal to have won it finally and is a dream come true. So I can relax a bit now and do what I do best. As far as responsibilities are concerned, I just need to do what I've been doing so far.

On whom he owes his win to...
My family especially my father, team and seconds. They have attended to all my requests, no matter how unreasonable those might have been. My seconds have worked hard and have not slept well so that I would be well prepared. They actually worked harder than I asked them to!


World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen has landed in Oslo. Watch Live Right now on NRK TV (can you spot him - swamped by fans and media?) He is signing autographs and taking media questions at the same time!

The World Chess Champion takes on question after question with fantastic aplomb.



Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Chess TV Exclusive: World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Tuesday, November 26, 2013
World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich in an exclusive interview for Chess TV: (http://chesstv.ru/) - первый в мире шахматный телеканал с круглосуточным вещанием и большим количеством прямых трансляций с крупнейших турниров (premier channel of the world of chess relaying chess programmes and principal tournaments).
 
Amul gets the final say on the Chennai World Chess Championship 2013 Viswanathan Anand versus Magnus Carlsen. One look at the cartoon and you're not really that sad about it all!


 You didn't miss this earlier one, did you? (and our earlier post Pattaya Kelappu Thala)


Amul, with the tag line, 'The taste of India' is well known for funny and witty ads featuring the famous 'Amul girl'. Their advertisements are a tradition in themselves featuring the most-talked about event of the week in India. Amul is an Indian dairy cooperative, and is sometimes even referred to as Anand (!!!) Milk Union Limited because it is based in Anand, Gujarat.

Viswanathan Anand Remains NIIT Brand Ambassador

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog
His failure to defend the World Chess Championship title notwithstanding, Indian chess legend Viswanathan Anand will continue to be the brand ambassador of premier IT education institute NIIT.

Anand, a five-time world chess champion, lost the crown to Norwegian prodigy Magnus Carlsen last week in the match conducted in his home city of Chennai.

The setback triggered speculation that Anand would be dropped as brand ambassador of NIIT, a brand he has promoted for quite a few years.

But NIIT Chairman Rajendra S Pawar said the iconic Grandmaster would remain on board.

"We salute Grandmaster Viswanathan Anand, for placing India prominently on the world chess map. A true sporting legend and a national hero, Anand continues to inspire young Indians to embrace the game of chess," he said in a statement.

"Anand has made chess a national movement by initiating 1.65 million students into the game of Chess through our joint initiative – the NIIT MindChampions' Academy. Together, NIIT and Anand will continue to work towards taking Indian chess to greater heights," he added.


* Brand ambassadors: Anand and Carlsen

Monday, November 25, 2013

It's Official: Magnus Carlsen is World Chess Champion 2013 (... And, yes, there's an FB Status Update!)

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Monday, November 25, 2013
Newly-crowned World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen on Monday took home a prize money of Rs 9.90 crore after he beat Viswanathan Anand in a keenly-watched contest that spanned over 10 days.

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister J. Jayalalitha gave away the prize money and trophies to the Norwegian sensation and the Indian veteran at a short ceremony that lasted about ten minutes.

Carlsen, the second youngest player after Garry Kasparov to win the coveted chess title of World Chess Champion, was awarded a gold-plated trophy, whose design was handpicked by Jayalalithaa, gold medal and an olive garland (wreath) at the private hotel where the two players had vied for the championship last week. 

Of course, the World Champion has to 
make it official on Facebook!

Anand, a five-time world champion whose title was wrested by the young challenger with a stupendous 6.5-3.5 score, had to settle for the runner-up prize money of Rs 6.03 crore, a silver plaque and silver medal.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov presented the respective medals to Carlsen and Anand.

The olive wreath, presented to Carlsen, was made of olive leaves from Nilgiris in the state.

The closing ceremony had no speeches, only background announcements in Tamil and English. National anthems of both Norway and India were also played.

Jayalalithaa gave away the winner's gold trophy to Carlsen, amid loud cheers from supporters. She also honoured the 22-year-old Norwegian with an olive garland from the Nilgiri hills, while World Chess Federation president Kirsan Illyumzhinov presented him a gold medal. Magnus Carlsen earned US $1,582,732/€ 1,169,883 for his efforts. Anand, who lost the crown in his home city, was rewarded with prize money of US $964,028/€ 711,021 and a silver medal.

Carlsen became the new world chess champion after defeating Anand by 6.5-3.5 in 12 game match held between November 7 and 22. The crucial tenth game went in a draw and favoured Carlsen to claim the title.

Former world champion Viswanathan Anand, who had checked out of the Presidential Suite on Saturday morning, came directly from his home and left after the ceremony. 


Anand was dressed formally in tie and jacket and Carlsen had his jacket on. The venue was the same hall in which the ten games were played. Over 500 people attended the crowded ceremony which also witnessed huge security personnel both inside and outside the hotel. -- PTI/Official website

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Magnus Carlsen beats Viswanathan Anand: Faking News' Most-Believable Satirical Tweet Feed

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Sunday, November 24, 2013
Magnus Carlsen beats Viswanathan Anand: Faking News' Most-Believable Satirical Tweet Feed at the World Chess Championship in Chennai. If you are in India, you will truly connect with this and have a great laugh ;)



The Anand - Carlsen World Chess Championship 2013 has given India a great chance to build on the hype that has been created and the All India Chess Federation must capitalise on the wave to help chess grow in India. 

In a most sensible reaction - the first we're reading in India by an Indian Grandmaster on the subject of Anand's loss - the young talent from New Delhi told NNIS Sports that it would be great if we had more strong chess tournaments in India as most youngsters have to go to Europe to play which is expensive and not very easy. 

GM Parimarjan Negi said Anand's loss is not a big blow to Indian chess at all and the best needs to be made out of the momentum that has been created for chess in India. Now isn't that the most sensible reaction AND accurate statement we've heard in India so far on the World Chess Championship 2013? Here is the video interview with GM Parimarjan Negi. 



* GM Negi's almost believable fun take

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Magnus Carlsen-in-the-Swimming Pool at Chennai Hyatt Regency: VG TV Video Goes Viral

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Saturday, November 23, 2013
Chennai World Chess Championship Hyatt Regency Celebrations: You might have already seen this: Here is the VG TV Magnus Carlsen video that has gone viral on the Internet. The World No. 1 is thrown into the swimming pool at the Chennai Hyatt Regency after winning the World Chess Championship beating Viswanathan Anand on Friday night. Left is the photo, the new World Chess Champion put up on his Facebook page after winning the title with the message: So happy to finally become World Champion!! Thanks for all your support! 




Chennai: Soon after completing the formalities of a draw to lift the World Chess Championship title, Carlsen said it was the pressure that did the trick on Anand.

Newly-crowned world champion Magnus Carlen on Friday said that five-time title holder Vishwanathan Anand crumbled under pressure in the World Chess Championship match here.




Soon after completing the formalities of a draw to lift the World Chess Championship title, Carlsen said it was the pressure that did the trick on Anand.

"I would like to take some responsibility for his mistakes that's for sure. People crack under pressure even in the World Championship. That's what the history shows. The blunders that he made are not the mistakes he usually makes. This is what I really wanted to do, make him sit at the board and play for a long time," Carlsen revealed his strategy that gave him a stupendous 6.5-3.5 victory over the defending champion.

Carlsen, the current world number one, said he was delighted to win the title and become the first Western champion since 1975.

"It feels good. It's been tough both here and in London (where Carlsen won the candidates to qualify here). I have been treated very well here in India. In general at some point I settled in and got the match to where I could play to my strength," he said.

Speaking about the last game when he tormented Anand for a long time before a draw was reached, Carlsen said it was a worthy end to the championship.

"I was just trying to play solidly in the opening. I am pretty happy with what I got, very solid position no weaknesses. As the game went on he started to drift a bit and then I thought as long as there is no risk I should try and win it. At some point after the time control, the variations were getting too complicated so I decided to shut it down to force a draw," said the Norwegian prodigy. -- PTI


Chennai: Indian media on Saturday said a new world order had dawned after local favourite Viswanathan Anand was outplayed by Norwegian prodigy Magnus Carlsen in the battle for the world chess title.

Carlsen, the 22-year-old reigning world number one, won three games and forced a seventh draw on Friday to achieve the victory mark of 6.5 points in Anand`s home city of Chennai, the capital of southern Tamil Nadu state.
 

Under the headline `New world order`, the Mail Today newspaper said Anand`s defeat "signalled the change of guard at the top of the chess world".

"His (Carlsen) brand of fighting, aggressive chess may also mark a new era," the English-language daily said, wondering if Anand would "try and earn a right to challenge Carlsen late next year".

Anand, who at 43 is 21 years older than his rival, lost the title he has held since 2007 despite a last-gasp fight in an attritional 130-move game on Friday that lasted four hours and 45 minutes.

Carlsen played four draws early in the tournament to counter Anand who could never recover from blunders he made in the crucial fifth game.
 
The Times of India said that with Anand`s comprehensive defeat, an era had ended in chess.

The paper said it was "poetic justice" that Carlsen heralded the new era in a country where the game of 64 squares has its origins.

"It took Anand 20 years to travel between GM (grandmaster) title (1988) and undisputed world title (2008). Carlsen has done it in less than 11 years," the daily said.
 

The Indian Express said with Carlsen`s triumph, "the world of chess is on the threshold of a generational change".

"It was not just Carlsen`s dominance... but what he represents that has fans excited," it wrote.

Carlsen missed by a few weeks becoming the youngest world champion, a record set by his one-time coach Kasparov in 1985.

The last Westerner to hold the world champion title was US legend Bobby Fischer who relinquished it in 1975.

The tournament was widely reported across Indian media which aired the matches live on television, building an unprecedented hype in a country where cricket is the number one sport.

The vernacular press also gave wide coverage to the championship with daily and detailed reports of their battle featuring on the top of the sports pages.

The Express attributed some of the excitement to the youthful personality of Carlsen, which it said, set him apart from past champions.

"Young and marketable, Carlsen is the antithesis of the traditional image of the reclusive and recondite chess genius," the newspaper said in a front-page report.

Quoting Russian legend Garry Kasparov, it said: "A win for Carlsen is also a win for the chess world." -- AFP