World Chess Championship 2013 Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen at Chennai Hyatt Regency: magnus carlsen

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Showing posts with label magnus carlsen. Show all posts
Showing posts with label magnus carlsen. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Playing against Anand was a Great Challenge: World Chess Champion's Father Henrik Carlsen

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Wednesday, December 18, 2013
Chennai, Nov 23 (ANI): Father of newly-crowned World Chess Champion praised Viswanathan Anand and said that Magnus Carlsen has learned a lot from him. Magnus Carlsen became the world chess champion as Game 10 of the chess championship ended in a draw in Chennai. Father of Magnus Carlsen, Henrik Carlsen expressed happiness and said everything has come out in the best possible way. While talking to journalists after the match, Henrik Carlsen praised Anand and said Magnus had learnt a lot from him.

New Delhi: Do you aspire to be the World Champion of Chess in your life? Have Carlsen’s moves and game talent at the recent World Chess Championship hooked you to this game like never before? Would you like to be in Carlsen’s shoes one day?

Send your thoughts in not more than 500 words on “How Magnus Carlsen has inspired you by winning the World Chess Champion title at the young age of 23” and “What lessons you have learnt from seeing his hard work and dedication to a game that originated in India thousands of years ago”.

Instructions/Rules:
- Entries should be only in English and typed (not handwritten)
- Entries should not be more than 500 words.
- Entries only from students between 13-15 years will be accepted. - An age certificate from your school is compulsory.
- Only one entry per student is allowed.
- Bulk entries from schools will not be accepted. Only individual entries should be sent.
- Competition is valid for Indian students only.
- Please provide your full name, name of your school, address, a passport size photograph and contact details along with your entry.

Deadline for submission: 30 January 2014
No phone calls/email enquiries please.
Results will be announced only to the winners directly, and via the Embassy’s website.

Entries to be sent via postal mail/courier (email entries will not be accepted) to:

Subject: ‘I want to be in Carlsen’s shoes one day’ Essay Competition

Attn: M. Arya, Royal Norwegian Embassy, 50-C, Shantipath, Chanakya Puri, New Delhi.


Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Why World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen defeated Viswanathan Anand: A Numerologist's Theory

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Tuesday, December 17, 2013
World Chess Champion 2014 Magnus Carlsen: An Indian numerologist's take on why Magnus Carlsen of Norway defeated former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand to become the World Chess Champion 2013 in Chennai a few weeks back.





Astrology and numerology are part of the Indian psyche and Indian cultural traditions. Some view it as a science, while others consider it a matter of superstition or personal whims! We expected, sooner or later, an astrologer or numerologist to come up with a theory surrounding the Magnus Carlsen versus Viswanathan Anand World Chess Championship 2013 in Chennai. We found one. Here is a video for those interested in the astro-numerology of the Carlsen - Anand World Chess Championship 2013 in Chennai:


(Chess Magazine Black & White team found this video on YouTube. The views expressed in the video are the numerologist's own.)

Friday, December 13, 2013

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen spends evening with Norwegian Young Talents

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Friday, December 13, 2013
Norwegian “Dream Team” – the luckiest chess talents in the world. Who else could boast about getting a two-hour instruction by the champion himself? :-) All the pictures and a report from the event are at the Stormester & Stormester Web site:



It was a great evening where World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen spent more than two hours with Norway's junior chess talents. Magnus Carlsen spoke individually to each player about chess training, playing tournaments and their aspirations. Much of the time, of course, was spent studying and analysing chess games. Carlsen also took up games he had played at the World Chess Championship in Chennai versus Viswanathan Anand. (Lots of photos at the Facebook page of Stormester & Stormester)


Sunday, December 1, 2013

'Because there is No Shame in Admitting that I'm a Fan of Magnus Carlsen...'

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Sunday, December 1, 2013
World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen in Chennai at the closing ceremony of the World Title Match versus Viswanathan Anand. Photo: official website



Times of India sports editor in Pune, Amit Karmakar declares all the reasons why Magnus Carlsen is so special! (This post first appeared: Times of India blogs dated Nov 28, 2013). 


WHY MAGNUS CARLSEN IS SO SPECIAL

  • Because there is no shame in admitting that I'm a fan of Magnus Carlsen. Outrageous young talent has this tendency to 'normalise'!

  • Because the way he plays the game: Uncompromising! When asked why he didn't offer a draw to Anand in the 10th game of the World championship match which could have sealed his title, he told his father and manager: "I'm a chess player. I'm supposed to PLAY chess!"

  • Because there can't be a more powerful slap than the above quote for those who play agreed, spineless, fightless, disgraceful draws at the top level. Agreed draws is the biggest threat to the game of chess after lack of corporate sponsorship.

  • Because the distribution of seven draws in the Anand-Carlsen match was thus: two with three-fold repetition, two dead draws; two insufficient material, one agreed draw. It came as an oasis after last year's Anand-Gelfand match.

  • Because he has openly said that opening preparation is a bit over-rated.

  • Because in his hands black or white pieces aim to attain the same terrain: equality (opening), quality (middlegame), superiority (endgame).

  • Because he has proved that majority of players agree for half-baked draws because they are mutually not confident about their endgame skills!

  • Because he is a pathbreaker. He can bypass opening preparation of the best opposition. And that may suggest that his understanding of openings is better than those who 'scholarise' it.

  • Because he calculates better than the computer in endgame.

  • Because he gives hope to all those by proving that one can excel in chess with smart work, not necessarily hard work which kills creativity, confidence and ability to fight till the end.

  • Because being an outgoing, sporty and fun person, he is the best brand ambassador for the game if you want to attract youth to the sport. 

  • Because he plays on equal, or slightly minus positions, as if nothing has happened. When others psychologically suffer due to lack of initiative on the board, he maintains his composure and plays with confidence.

  • Because he is the "most undisputed" world champion since Garry Kasparov. Of course, Kramnik and Anand proved their credentials beyond doubt. But they got a shot at the matchplay titles in dubious circumstances. Kramnik didn't prove before his 2000 match against Kasparov that he was a worthy challenger. And when Anand became the challenger through Mexico win in 2007, Topalov was not eligible to play that tournament.

  • Because he is undisputed world No. 1 and won a right to challenge Anand though a proper candidates tournament. It's a poetic justice that one win there counted for more than Kramnik's two draws. 

  • Because he defeated Anand 3-0. Not via tie-breaks or not with +1 score. He showed his strength and deep understanding of the game on the highest stage.

  • Because Anand responded to a somewhat irritating question after losing his title (would he have chosen a better challenger to his throne than Carlsen?): "I didn't choose him." Well, Anand is spot on. Magnus was chosen by the bigger force.


Saturday, November 30, 2013

Recent Chess Trend is away from Openings as Computers have killed Opening Phase: Vishy Anand

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Saturday, November 30, 2013
Here is another cool interview with former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand after yesterday's IBNLive video interview with Rajdeep Sardesai. Excerpts from FirstPost interview with Grandmaster Vishy Anand of India:

Q: Magnus Carlsen has, at various points, mentioned that once he sits down on the chess board he doesn’t believe that anyone could beat him. He carried that same confidence into the World Championship match too. What were your thoughts at the start of the match? Did you feel invincible too? 

Viswanathan Anand: I thought that if I had a good start, I would be able to play well. I thought that if I had a good start, I could force him out of his comfort zones. I was under no illusions that I would have to raise my game – but that’s exactly what I had worked so hard for. I knew I had a chance. I knew my recent shape had not been very good. But I was hoping that I had managed to turn all that around. 
 
Viswanathan Anand at World Chess Championship 2013 closing ceremony. Photo: Official website 

Q: A match like this is always tough. In the sense, it almost feels like you are locked in a cage at times. At what point did you think it was over for you?

Viswanathan Anand: Well, it was staggered. The first few games were probably okay. I thought I held my own. The fifth game (his endgame errors cost game five) loss hit me really hard. It was precisely the thing that I had worked so hard on; the areas that I had sought to improve in my preparation and I was unable to execute. In that sense, I failed. The 9th game blunder didn’t change things very much – I didn’t see a win, it would have been a draw. The 10th game was really nothing.

Q: So what is it about Carlsen? Did any aspect of his game surprise you?

Viswanathan Anand: He surprised me by changing so little. I know how he plays. But I expected him to come out and try something different. But he stuck to his guns – it was brave. It was also unexpected for me. Usually for a World Championship match, people work on something different… maybe something to surprise the opponent. Carlsen just stayed the same.

Q: You have said that you couldn’t figure out Carlsen’s style. What does that mean?

Viswanathan Anand: I thought I could get a grip on him. I thought that I could force him to make mistakes. I thought that if I stayed with him in the early going, I would be able to match him. But his style makes it difficult. In a sense, he is an all-rounder. He can do everything well and he makes mistakes – but they aren’t big enough to take advantage of. He is also unconventional – there are times when he will play something and take it back on the next move… to the same place.

Q: Did it feel like you were playing a computer?

Viswanathan Anand: His approach resembles… I hesitate to say… computer. Put him in front of one and he’d lose easily. But he is very confident of his calculating ability – so in that sense… yes, probably like a human computer – if that makes sense.

Q: One of the things that were mentioned before the start of the match was that Anand was the openings specialist and Carlsen took over in the middle and end game. Do you think you did enough with that advantage?

Viswanathan Anand: I think what is not understood about Carlsen is that he is not bad at openings. He is not a specialist but a generalist. He can play a lot of opening and he can play them at a fairly high level. His aim is to get a solid position and you can’t do that at the top level if you are bad with openings. This thing about openings is an exaggeration.

Q: So if Carlsen were to play Kasaprov – you have played them both – who wins?

Viswanathan Anand: One thing that is clear about Carlsen is that he is one of a kind. I am a big believer in comparisons. I would say both are very good, very strong. But these are the kind of kind of comparisons that chess buffs all over the world make all the time. It probably just adds to the fun… Well, Carlsen is a more all-round player. His strengths are harder to determine. Kasaparov was a specialist. He thought hard about his game and had very specific strengths. So if anything, I would Carlsen the edge there. Being an all-rounder is not easy – you are backing yourself to keep up the level throughout the game but somehow Carlsen has managed it.

Q: In interviews to the Norwegian press, Carlsen has criticised your approach, saying that you blamed tournament losses to preparation for the world championships. He has also said that he will never do that. Your thoughts?

Viswanathan Anand: I guess you have to put up with some snide remarks when you have lost. But honestly, what can I say…

Q: You have spoken about wanting to play in the Candidates next year. Does this loss change anything? Will your method change? Will you change?

Viswanathan Anand: I think the recent trend is away from openings. In a sense, computers have killed the opening phase. There is only so much that you can do. So if anything can be done, it is to rebalance the game. That can only happen by concentrating on the middle and end game. For now though, I have taken a break from chess. Then I got to London for a tournament. Then I take another break – a long break. That’s when I will give it some serious thought – what I want to do and how I want to do it.

Q: Do you think about your legacy? Is it about time to start thinking about it?

Viswanathan Anand: Well, there are times when you wonder what you have done for the sport. I am happy at the kind of response that the match got in India and I feel I played some part in it. I would like to believe that India understands chess and with NIIT Mind Champions academy, I hope to help more players in the country. A legacy though is not just about what I think. Finally, how are you going to wind down? Probably with a game of Blitz – maybe on the internet, maybe just at home. Blitz would be fun. For the moment, I just want to enjoy chess without thinking of results; without thinking really.

Friday, November 29, 2013

No Retirement, Asserts Viswanathan Anand (Must Watch Exclusive Video Interview with CNN-IBN Live)

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Friday, November 29, 2013
Former World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand has said that retirement is not on the cards for him after the recent world title loss to Magnus Carlsen of Norway. The Indian Grandmaster said he needed some time off from chess to spend with his family. Anand will play the upcoming London Chess Classic from December 7, 2013 before taking a sabbatical. 



World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen`s Blog at Arctic Securities
Chennai World Championship Match 2013 Victory!

Magnus and (most of the) his team returned to Norway yesterday to a great reception. It is time to finally provide an account of the last games. The change of direction of the match after the last rest day was appreciated by the spectators. In game 9 Anand came out blazing with 1.d4 and the 5.f3 Nimzo-Indian. 


The early g4 lead to a race, Magnus advancing on the queen side and Anand’s pawn storm on the king side. It looked dangerous for black and Magnus needed to find all the right moves to survive. After white played Rf4 threatening Rh4 and mate on h7, the position was still unclear despite the extra black queen. 

With less than 10 minutes left on 12 moves Anand suddenly miscalculated and after Nf1, (instead of Bf1) Qe1 clinched a full point for Magnus. Not many had significant expectations for the last game as a draw with white would finish the match for Magnus, and Anand seemed beyond realistic hope trailing 3-6. 

Some inaccuracies by both players, including what was probably a missed win or two by Magnus does not diminish the fact that they fought until just kings were left on the table! 

Consequently Magnus won the World Championship title with 6.5 points against 3.5 in the best-of-twelve match! On the prize giving ceremony, Magnus was awarded an impressive trophy, a gold medal, a symbolic check and a garland, and Anand received a huge silver plate and his check. 

In the VIP lounge right after the ceremony, eager photographers taking pictures of Magnus with the gold medal fought for the best places creating a commotion we have never experienced before except maybe earlier in this match! With some help from the organisers and local police Magnus and the team could move on to interviews and press sessions in the media centre upstairs. 

______________________________________________
A sponsoring agreement has been agreed between Arctic Securities and Magnus Carlsen. Magnus became an International Grandmaster at the age of 13, the youngest at the time. In October 2009, during the Nanjing Pearl Spring tournament, he became the fifth chess player in the history to achieve an Elo-rating over 2800 – by far the youngest to do so. That year he also became The World Blitz Chess Champion. On January the 1st of 2010 the new FIDE list was published and at the age of 19 Magnus became the youngest ever chess player to be ranked World Number One. Carlsen is the best representative for top excellence within both analysis and implementation.

_______________________________

Magnus felt the turning point of the match was game 3 and 4. Despite Magnus’s difficult position in game 3, the way that Anand seemed slightly uncomfortable and did not go for the critical lines contributed to a renewed confidence on Magnus’s part. 

From game 4 onwards he settled into his usual stride and just enjoyed the match. It might be a disadvantage to play on your opponent’s home ground in chess as in other sports, but this effect was ameliorated by the way the organisers, headed by Mr. Sundar, and the hotel with all its great staff and our butler Syed, really did everything they could to make Magnus and the team comfortable.

The playing conditions, the hotel rooms, the food, and service, the opportunity to play football and basketball on some of the rest days and the hospitality and kindness shown by Indians we met, all contributed to our well-being. Thank you, we are eternally grateful! 

Once Anand lost in round 5, playing at home with all the expectations and broad support he received throughout the match might even have been a significant disadvantage in the end. After the match Magnus observed that playing on one of the players home ground adds another dimension to the match. 

At the airport we were greeted with water canons and met by the Baerum mayor, journalists and enthusiasts. Magnus is really grateful to his seconds, headed by Jon Ludvig Hammer, his team, and everyone who has supported him one way or another to help him reach and win the World Championship match against V.Anand. Thank you!! 

--For Team Carlsen, Henrik C., Haslum, November 28th, 2013 

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Magnus Carlsen dominated from the Start: BBC Video

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Thursday, November 28, 2013
Here is the cool BBC video on Magnus Carlsen winning the World Chess Championship title by beating Viswanathan Anand in Chennai recently.




Congratulations, Magnus!

Last updated: 22.11.2013 // The Embassy of Norway warmly congratulates the new Chess World Champion, Magnus Carlsen, on winning the World Chess Championship, held in Chennai.

The young champion has also truly managed to put Norway on the map in India, perhaps as never before. He has excelled as an Ambassador for his country both in India and around the world as a fantastic player and sportsman that we are very proud of.

We would also like to pay our respect to Viswanathan Anand, for his play and great sportsmanship, for his contributions to chess internationally and in his own country over many years.

The Embassy would like to extend a big thank you to the organizers and to the government of Tamil Nadu, led by Chief Minister Ms J. Jayalalithaa, for their kind hospitality and for making the championship a most successful event.

We look forward to welcoming everyone to the Chess Olympiad 2014 in Tromsø, the Arctic City of Northern Norway. Thus the games will continue, now with even stronger ties of friendship between Norway and India.

Eivind S. Homme
Ambassador


* The Norwegian Embassy in New Delhi credits the photo to Magnus Carlsen's official website.
* His Excellency Eivind S. Homme's biography is here.

Viswanathan Anand: A Victim of his own Hubris?

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog
Sumit Chakraberty is the author of 'Master Laster: What They Don't Tell You About Sachin Tendulkar' (This article first appeared in The Economic Times)

On hindsight, it seems apparent that Viswanathan Anand should have taken more of an initiative at the very outset of his world championship match with Magnus Carlsen in Chennai. He quickly forced a draw with black pieces in the first game, and then opted for a queen exchange and another quick draw when Carlsen surprised him with the Caro Kann defence in the second game. Even in the third game, which seemed to be developing into the sort of complexity in the middle that Anand relishes, he chose a risk-free line when a pawn sacrifice was offered.

Carlsen appeared uncharacteristically vulnerable in that first quarter of the championship. But Anand could not pounce on that unexpected vulnerability, because his own strategy was to put safety first, and avoid risks. In fact, from game four onwards, he seemed quite willing to be drawn into long end games, which is known to be Carlsen's strength.

A five-time world champion does not play like that, especially at the start of a championship, unless that is what he had planned. Even at the end, after everything had gone horribly wrong, Anand never admitted that his risk-free strategy was wrong; he only said he had failed in its execution. So what could Anand have been thinking?

Carlsen is not too hot on opening theory, nor does he set much store by complicated middle games with too many pieces. His preferred route to a kill is an endgame that stretches for hours until his victim succumbs to relentless pressure or makes a mistake out of sheer mental exhaustion.

But what if somebody as good as Anand could withstand that pressure and not make mistakes in endgame after endgame? Would it then be Carlsen who would eventually get frustrated and crack, or be forced to try a different tack where he is less sure of himself ? For somebody who has been world champion for so many years, it is natural to back oneself to concentrate and play error-free chess, especially in the simplified positions of an endgame, however long it stretched. Why should the world champion be the one to open himself to counterattack by risky play in the middle game, while the challenger sat back and played solid, safe chess?

Ultimately, Anand was a victim of this self-belief. He did not take his age or fitness into account. He also discounted his erratic play in the last year or so, and Carlsen's immaculate record for over two years during which he was rated the No.1 player in the world. If he had factored all that in, he would have happily risked going into uncharted territory in the middle game when Carlsen deliberately made sub-optimal moves to disturb Anand's prepared lines of play. In fact, he came close to beating Carlsen only in Game 9 when he went on a risky all-out attack in desperation.

Anand may still have lost if he had taken more risks from the beginning, but at least his strategy would have reflected selfawareness, rather than being in denial about the reality of his own age and his rival's No.1 status. The deposed champion has won hearts over the years with his humility, but may have succumbed to his own hubris in the end.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Magnus Carlsen: I can Relax a bit as World No. 1 is also World Chess Champion Now and do What I do Best!

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Magnus Carlsen Interview: One of the first, and delightful, interviews conducted with the World No. 1 was by Susan Ninan for Times of India.

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway in Chennai. (Official website)

CHENNAI: The crown sits pretty, so does the newly-coronated king's charm. Magnus Carlsen is a picture of earnest patience as he braved questions by the dozen and posed almost endlessly for shutterbugs, all with the lopsided smile in place. Two days after his title conquest, the 22 year-old Norwegian spoke on a range of topics, from why he chose not to reveal his seconds, what he has learnt from Anand to why the five-time Indian champion does not figure among his favourites to turn challenger. Excerpts...
On whether the match ended earlier than he expected...

I thought it was hard at the start. In the first game, Vishy introduced novelty in a really obscure line and when I was discussing the game with him afterwards I was very impressed with everything he'd seen and how fast he had been thinking. I thought to myself that if he's prepared even in this line, how am I ever going to catch him off guard? But fortunately it turned out that he was also a bit nervous after a few games and I settled in and dominated the match.

On why Anand does not figure (Carlsen had recently named Aronian and Kramnik) among those he feels could be his next challenger...

Firstly, Vishy will have to figure out if he would want to play in the Candidates tournament. Although he's an all-time great player, his results lately have not been too good and he'll need some time to readjust to be able to come back. It all depends on him now. He needs to figure some things out and if he manages to keep his motivation after this match he will still be a force to reckon with. Right now though I don't think he's the biggest favourite at the Candidates.

On what he's learnt from Anand...

To be honest I've learnt a lot from him in the past, both playing against him and especially while training with him. Just the kind of positions that he understands, the way he would just outplay me like no one else did in several kinds of positions. Also the precision with which he analyses games and positions has been an eye-opener. In this match I showed him in a way that although he's taught me many things in the past, it's probably now my turn to teach him. So, it's safe to say I've surpassed him now.

On whether all his strategies worked against Anand and how much of a role age and psychology played...

The main objective in my preparation was to get a playable position and not to come under any great pressure from the opening. I managed to equalise the game from the opening especially with black pieces and was able to push and outplay him in the rest of the games. Age was partly a factor. I could also sense that he was nervous and vulnerable. But regardless of everything else, he just lost to a better player.

On whether next year's title match is already on his mind...

Yes, I'm already thinking about it. It is also a reason why I have not spoken much about my current seconds since they could be part of my team then as well. I have the lead in world rankings and the title as well now. I don't think it's my duty to think who will play against me, it should in fact be the other way round. My opponents will have to figure out how to deal with me. I think I will be the man to beat for quite some time now.

On whether he believes the 12-game format is the right way to go about the title contest...

Anything between 12-16 games is fine. More than that would not be ideal in the modern era.

On what the title means to him and the responsibilities of being a world chess champion...

I've been ranked number 1 in the world for sometime now, but it always has been a bit of a burden not having the world title. It means a great deal to have won it finally and is a dream come true. So I can relax a bit now and do what I do best. As far as responsibilities are concerned, I just need to do what I've been doing so far.

On whom he owes his win to...
My family especially my father, team and seconds. They have attended to all my requests, no matter how unreasonable those might have been. My seconds have worked hard and have not slept well so that I would be well prepared. They actually worked harder than I asked them to!


Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Chess TV Exclusive: World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Tuesday, November 26, 2013
World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen speaks to Anastasiya Karlovich in an exclusive interview for Chess TV: (http://chesstv.ru/) - первый в мире шахматный телеканал с круглосуточным вещанием и большим количеством прямых трансляций с крупнейших турниров (premier channel of the world of chess relaying chess programmes and principal tournaments).
 

Monday, November 25, 2013

It's Official: Magnus Carlsen is World Chess Champion 2013 (... And, yes, there's an FB Status Update!)

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Monday, November 25, 2013
Newly-crowned World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen on Monday took home a prize money of Rs 9.90 crore after he beat Viswanathan Anand in a keenly-watched contest that spanned over 10 days.

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister J. Jayalalitha gave away the prize money and trophies to the Norwegian sensation and the Indian veteran at a short ceremony that lasted about ten minutes.

Carlsen, the second youngest player after Garry Kasparov to win the coveted chess title of World Chess Champion, was awarded a gold-plated trophy, whose design was handpicked by Jayalalithaa, gold medal and an olive garland (wreath) at the private hotel where the two players had vied for the championship last week. 

Of course, the World Champion has to 
make it official on Facebook!

Anand, a five-time world champion whose title was wrested by the young challenger with a stupendous 6.5-3.5 score, had to settle for the runner-up prize money of Rs 6.03 crore, a silver plaque and silver medal.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov presented the respective medals to Carlsen and Anand.

The olive wreath, presented to Carlsen, was made of olive leaves from Nilgiris in the state.

The closing ceremony had no speeches, only background announcements in Tamil and English. National anthems of both Norway and India were also played.

Jayalalithaa gave away the winner's gold trophy to Carlsen, amid loud cheers from supporters. She also honoured the 22-year-old Norwegian with an olive garland from the Nilgiri hills, while World Chess Federation president Kirsan Illyumzhinov presented him a gold medal. Magnus Carlsen earned US $1,582,732/€ 1,169,883 for his efforts. Anand, who lost the crown in his home city, was rewarded with prize money of US $964,028/€ 711,021 and a silver medal.

Carlsen became the new world chess champion after defeating Anand by 6.5-3.5 in 12 game match held between November 7 and 22. The crucial tenth game went in a draw and favoured Carlsen to claim the title.

Former world champion Viswanathan Anand, who had checked out of the Presidential Suite on Saturday morning, came directly from his home and left after the ceremony. 


Anand was dressed formally in tie and jacket and Carlsen had his jacket on. The venue was the same hall in which the ten games were played. Over 500 people attended the crowded ceremony which also witnessed huge security personnel both inside and outside the hotel. -- PTI/Official website

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Magnus Carlsen beats Viswanathan Anand: Faking News' Most-Believable Satirical Tweet Feed

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Sunday, November 24, 2013
Magnus Carlsen beats Viswanathan Anand: Faking News' Most-Believable Satirical Tweet Feed at the World Chess Championship in Chennai. If you are in India, you will truly connect with this and have a great laugh ;)



The Anand - Carlsen World Chess Championship 2013 has given India a great chance to build on the hype that has been created and the All India Chess Federation must capitalise on the wave to help chess grow in India. 

In a most sensible reaction - the first we're reading in India by an Indian Grandmaster on the subject of Anand's loss - the young talent from New Delhi told NNIS Sports that it would be great if we had more strong chess tournaments in India as most youngsters have to go to Europe to play which is expensive and not very easy. 

GM Parimarjan Negi said Anand's loss is not a big blow to Indian chess at all and the best needs to be made out of the momentum that has been created for chess in India. Now isn't that the most sensible reaction AND accurate statement we've heard in India so far on the World Chess Championship 2013? Here is the video interview with GM Parimarjan Negi. 



* GM Negi's almost believable fun take

Saturday, November 23, 2013

Magnus Carlsen-in-the-Swimming Pool at Chennai Hyatt Regency: VG TV Video Goes Viral

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Saturday, November 23, 2013
Chennai World Chess Championship Hyatt Regency Celebrations: You might have already seen this: Here is the VG TV Magnus Carlsen video that has gone viral on the Internet. The World No. 1 is thrown into the swimming pool at the Chennai Hyatt Regency after winning the World Chess Championship beating Viswanathan Anand on Friday night. Left is the photo, the new World Chess Champion put up on his Facebook page after winning the title with the message: So happy to finally become World Champion!! Thanks for all your support! 




Chennai: Soon after completing the formalities of a draw to lift the World Chess Championship title, Carlsen said it was the pressure that did the trick on Anand.

Newly-crowned world champion Magnus Carlen on Friday said that five-time title holder Vishwanathan Anand crumbled under pressure in the World Chess Championship match here.




Soon after completing the formalities of a draw to lift the World Chess Championship title, Carlsen said it was the pressure that did the trick on Anand.

"I would like to take some responsibility for his mistakes that's for sure. People crack under pressure even in the World Championship. That's what the history shows. The blunders that he made are not the mistakes he usually makes. This is what I really wanted to do, make him sit at the board and play for a long time," Carlsen revealed his strategy that gave him a stupendous 6.5-3.5 victory over the defending champion.

Carlsen, the current world number one, said he was delighted to win the title and become the first Western champion since 1975.

"It feels good. It's been tough both here and in London (where Carlsen won the candidates to qualify here). I have been treated very well here in India. In general at some point I settled in and got the match to where I could play to my strength," he said.

Speaking about the last game when he tormented Anand for a long time before a draw was reached, Carlsen said it was a worthy end to the championship.

"I was just trying to play solidly in the opening. I am pretty happy with what I got, very solid position no weaknesses. As the game went on he started to drift a bit and then I thought as long as there is no risk I should try and win it. At some point after the time control, the variations were getting too complicated so I decided to shut it down to force a draw," said the Norwegian prodigy. -- PTI


Chennai: Indian media on Saturday said a new world order had dawned after local favourite Viswanathan Anand was outplayed by Norwegian prodigy Magnus Carlsen in the battle for the world chess title.

Carlsen, the 22-year-old reigning world number one, won three games and forced a seventh draw on Friday to achieve the victory mark of 6.5 points in Anand`s home city of Chennai, the capital of southern Tamil Nadu state.
 

Under the headline `New world order`, the Mail Today newspaper said Anand`s defeat "signalled the change of guard at the top of the chess world".

"His (Carlsen) brand of fighting, aggressive chess may also mark a new era," the English-language daily said, wondering if Anand would "try and earn a right to challenge Carlsen late next year".

Anand, who at 43 is 21 years older than his rival, lost the title he has held since 2007 despite a last-gasp fight in an attritional 130-move game on Friday that lasted four hours and 45 minutes.

Carlsen played four draws early in the tournament to counter Anand who could never recover from blunders he made in the crucial fifth game.
 
The Times of India said that with Anand`s comprehensive defeat, an era had ended in chess.

The paper said it was "poetic justice" that Carlsen heralded the new era in a country where the game of 64 squares has its origins.

"It took Anand 20 years to travel between GM (grandmaster) title (1988) and undisputed world title (2008). Carlsen has done it in less than 11 years," the daily said.
 

The Indian Express said with Carlsen`s triumph, "the world of chess is on the threshold of a generational change".

"It was not just Carlsen`s dominance... but what he represents that has fans excited," it wrote.

Carlsen missed by a few weeks becoming the youngest world champion, a record set by his one-time coach Kasparov in 1985.

The last Westerner to hold the world champion title was US legend Bobby Fischer who relinquished it in 1975.

The tournament was widely reported across Indian media which aired the matches live on television, building an unprecedented hype in a country where cricket is the number one sport.

The vernacular press also gave wide coverage to the championship with daily and detailed reports of their battle featuring on the top of the sports pages.

The Express attributed some of the excitement to the youthful personality of Carlsen, which it said, set him apart from past champions.

"Young and marketable, Carlsen is the antithesis of the traditional image of the reclusive and recondite chess genius," the newspaper said in a front-page report.

Quoting Russian legend Garry Kasparov, it said: "A win for Carlsen is also a win for the chess world." -- AFP

Friday, November 22, 2013

Magnus Carlsen Dethrones Viswanathan Anand to become World Chess Champion 2013

Posted by World Chess Championship 2013 News Blog Friday, November 22, 2013
Five-time title-holder Viswanathan Anand's reign as the world chess champion came to an end today with Norway's Magnus Carlsen taking the crown after a hard-fought draw in the 10th game of the World Chess Championship Match. 
 


Carlsen, who will be 23 years on 30th November, closed the championship with two games to spare by taking his tally to required 6.5 points out of a possible ten, winning three and drawing seven games.

In what could be marked as the dawn of a new era in the chess world, Carlsen showed stellar effort yet again by not going for a tame draw when one was enough for him to take the title home.

Instead, the Norwegian made Anand suffer for a long and gruelling four hours and forty five minutes before the Indian could heave a sigh of relief in what was the most one-sided world championship match in modern history.

Anand had won the world championship title five times -- 2000, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012 -- but ironically was dethroned in his home town of Chennai.

In a dubious first, this was the only time that Anand failed to win a single game in a world chess championship match.

Starting with his journey in 1991, Anand had always scored at least one victory in each of the matches that he played in the last 22 years.
 


Carlsen was in his elements right through the tenth game getting what he wanted out of the opening and then pursuing on his favourite mission on grinding out opponent. Anand, this time, did not collapse and came up with some fantastic defense he is known for to steer the game to a draw.

Anand, on expected lines, employed the Sicilian defense and faced the Moscow variation that Carlsen had employed before.

There were no surprises earlier as both players opted for routine theory and it was a Maroczy bind structure on board after Carlsen came up with a check on move three, parting with his light squared Bishop for a knight.

On move 14, Carlsen took back Anand’s light Bishop to even things up and it was again a slow grind thereafter that has been hallmark of Carlsen’s play in this match.

With two minor pieces off the board, the position had only a minuscule advantage for white but Carlsen did not go for the draw. It was on the 21st move that many pundits believed both players will be happy to repeat moves.
 


Carlsen for obvious reasons and Anand because there was not much hope. However, the Norwegian was the first to deviate from a possible repetition.

Anand found some solace after trading another set of minor pieces but the pressure remained on the Indian. Carlsen went for his final liquidation plan on the 28th move when he pushed his king pawn to fifth rank. Anand temporarily parted with a pawn and recovered it some moves later but this led the game to a pure knight and pawns endgame.

To make matters worse for Anand, Carlsen retained his small advantage as his king quickly walked over to the king side and penetrated the fifth rank. Anand’s knight and king were confined to the defense and to stop further damage.
 
The players reached the first time control in just three hours when 40 moves were completed but by then it was also clear that either Carlsen will win or it will be a draw. In either case Anand’s campaign was coming to an end and it was a pretty unpleasant task for the five times world champion.

As the game progressed both the players were engrossed in their own ways. Anand showed some signs of nervousness while Carlsen at one point leaned like ‘the Crocodile’ he wants to be if he was an animal. Relaxed but ready to eat the prey when they came its way.

The situation took another dramatic turn on the 46th move when Carlsen sank in to a long thought. The Norwegian looked at the possibilities of sacrificing his last remaining pieces and this is what he did a couple of moves later. In return, Anand lost all his pawns and the players promoted new queens on the board.

Anand had an extra Knight but Carlsen had Queen and a couple of dangerous looking pawns on the queen side.

Finding just the right moves, Anand forced an exchange pretty soon leading to a forced draw. The epic game lasted 65 moves.

Apart from the winning the title, Carlsen will also take home 60 per cent of around Rs. 14 crore as part of his winner’s purse.

The final score stood 6.5 - 3.5 in favour of Magnus Carlsen. -- PTI/Photos Anastasia Karlovich/official website
Game 10 Moves
Magnus Carlsen - Viswanathan Anand 1/2-1/2

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. d4 cxd4 5. Qxd4 a6 6. Bxd7+ Bxd7 7. c4 Nf6 8. Bg5 e6 9. Nc3 Be7 10. O-O Bc6 11. Qd3 O-O 12. Nd4 Rc8 13. b3 Qc7 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. Rac1 h6 16. Be3 Nd7 17. Bd4 Rfd8 18. h3 Qc7 19. Rfd1 Qa5 20. Qd2 Kf8 21. Qb2 Kg8 22. a4 Qh5 23. Ne2 Bf6 24. Rc3 Bxd4 25. Rxd4 Qe5 26. Qd2 Nf6 27. Re3 Rd7 28. a5 Qg5 29. e5 Ne8 30. exd6 Rc6 31. f4 Qd8 32. Red3 Rcxd6 33. Rxd6 Rxd6 34. Rxd6 Qxd6 35. Qxd6 Nxd6 36. Kf2 Kf8 37. Ke3 Ke7 38. Kd4 Kd7 39. Kc5 Kc7 40. Nc3 Nf5 41. Ne4 Ne3 42. g3 f5 43. Nd6 g5 44. Ne8+ Kd7 45. Nf6+ Ke7 46. Ng8+ Kf8 47. Nxh6 gxf4 48. gxf4 Kg7 49. Nxf5+ exf5 50. Kb6 Ng2 51. Kxb7 Nxf4 52. Kxa6 Ne6 53. Kb6 f4 54. a6 f3 55. a7 f2 56. a8=Q f1=Q 57. Qd5 Qe1 58. Qd6 Qe3+ 59. Ka6 Nc5+ 60. Kb5 Nxb3 61. Qc7+ Kh6 62. Qb6+ Qxb6+ 63. Kxb6 Kh5 64. h4 Kxh4 65. c5 Nxc5 1/2-1/2